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NYPA Uses Digital Simulation of the New York Power System to Test Advanced Grid Technologies

The New York Power Authority (NYPA), the largest state public power organization in the nation, will test, model and develop innovative solutions for energy systems at its research and development facility – the Advanced Grid Innovation Laboratory for Energy (AGILe) – at its White Plains headquarters. With expertise and support from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the lab will simulate the impacts of new technologies before they are deployed on New York’s electric grid, allowing NYPA and other research participants to evaluate their effects on system reliability, performance, and resiliency. The research aims to also help renewable resources come online more quickly and integrate more effectively to the New York state grid.  

“AGILe will allow researchers to more quickly model the system and identify any potential issues – especially as more renewable energy sources, like wind, solar, and energy storage, are brought online,” said Gil C. Quiniones,NYPA president and CEO. “AGILe’s ability to simulate how new technology will interact with our transmission system will solidify NYPA and New York State as leaders in grid modernization and create models for other utilities to use in their power systems across the country.”

The first phase of development at the lab, scheduled to be complete by the end of 2018, involves the creation of a digital, real‑time simulation model of the entire New York State transmission system. Once the model is complete, researchers from government, industry, and academia will be able to use advanced computing methods to simulate the implementation of new technologies for better forecasting and planning and to assist with the commercialization of emerging technologies. AGILe will focus particularly on advanced transmission applications, cybersecurity solutions, sensors, substation automation, and power-electronics controller technologies.

“This is part of the industry-leading effort to make wind, solar, storage and customer resources (like flexible loads, batteries and electric vehicle charging) all part of an integrated grid.  We are very excited to coordinate the research at the AGILe lab with the overall integrated grid research at EPRI,” said Mark McGranaghan, EPRI’s vice president, distribution and energy utilization.

The initiative also will foster collaboration and research with other participants in the state’s energy sector to strengthen infrastructure, improve efficiency, and encourage expanded use of renewable energy resources. In a memorandum of understanding, the New York transmission owners and other key energy leaders in the State have all agreed to conduct collaborative research with NYPA at AGILe. Approximately $20 million has been approved for implementation and lab activities so far.

An essential component of NYPA’s Vision 2020 Strategic Plan, AGILe advances NYPA’s digital transformation and furthers Governor Andrew M. Cuomo’s Reforming the Energy Vision (REV) strategy by informing new and innovative ways to build a smarter, cleaner, and more reliable power grid.

NYPA owns and operates approximately one‑third of New York’s high‑voltage power lines. These lines transmit power from NYPA’s two large-scale hydroelectric generation facilities, connecting more than 6,000 megawatts of renewable energy into New York State’s power grid.

“As our grid continues to evolve --- as we get smarter, cleaner, more data-intensive --- we need faster, more secure systems to get the most from our data and from our grid; we can make better decisions in real-time, and ensure safe, reliable, affordable, and environmentally responsible power delivery for the benefits of New Yorkers, and consumers and society as a whole,” said Alan Ettlinger, director of Research Technology Development and Innovation at NYPA.

Visit NYPA's Web site for more information. 

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