T&D World Magazine

Session 10: HVDC Transmission - Technology Update and Trends for Future

Date: Thursday, October 25, 2012 at 2:00pm ET/11:00am PT

The installed base of High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) system applications have increased dramatically all over the world. Conventional thyristor based systems have now reached +/- 800,000 volt and 6000 MW for long distance overhead line applications in China. Solid dielectric cables operating at 320 kV and other submarine cables operating at 400 kV or higher in combination with new insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBT) type converters have been emerged with power levels that might reach 1,000 MW in the not too distant future. HVDC grids might even be practical for transmission off shore wind power plants to shore. This presentation is intended to familiarize the audience with the following:

  • The past and possible future use of HVDC systems n North America as well as developments in other parts of the world.
  • Characteristics of the HVDC applications and comparing these to those of AC transmission
  • Discussion of converter system fundamentals with comparing and contrasting the differences between thyristor based and IGBT based systems.
  • Major elements and design of thyristor based systems.
  • Major elements and design of IGBT based systems.
  • Multiterminal systems and possibilities for HVDC Grids
  • Environmental issues
  • Standardization issues and policy that might impact HVDC


About The Series:
Burns & McDonnell and GE, in partnership with Transmission & Distribution World, are continuing a series webinars in 2012 exploring innovative technologies and ideas that will truly change how power is delivered and consumed.

Join Burns & McDonnell, GE and their clients as they introduce online discussions that will challenge your thinking.


Michael E. Beehler, PE,Vice President
Burns & McDonnell



John D. McDonald, P.E.
Director, Technical Strategy
& Policy Development
GE Digital Energy




Stig L. Nilsson
Principal Engineer
Exponent

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