T&D World Magazine
National Grid foundation engineering

Since 1871, an active railway has crossed Hamlin Marsh, and in the 1920s, crews built a 115-kV transmission line just 50 feet from the track on a parallel line. To improve reliability, National Grid endeavored to reconductor 7 miles of this decades-old line with minimal impact to the environment.

Foundation Engineering

National Grid uses helical pier foundations for complicated line rebuild through wetlands with access restrictions.

To increase reliability of the electrical grid just north of Syracuse, New York, U.S., National Grid needed to reconductor the 7-mile (11.3-km), 115-kV Clay-General Electric #14 line to increase its thermal rating. The reconductoring project would consist of replacing approximately 50 transmission structures. A mile (1.6 km) of the right-of-way (ROW) passed through the Hamlin Marsh, a swamp-covered lake bed with standing water and access restrictions. There also was a transmission line cr

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